Does doubling the distance between two objects half the gravitational force between them?

already exists.

Would you like to merge this question into it?

already exists as an alternate of this question.

Would you like to make it the primary and merge this question into it?

exists and is an alternate of .

No, that reduces it to one quarter, not to half.

In the equation for gravitational force (F=G(m1m2/r2) the distance is squared, so doubling the r (2r2) results in the two in front of the r also being squared, resulting in 1/4 the force. This is the same for electrical force which is a similar equation ( F=K(q1q2/r2). Likewise, halving the distance quadruples the force, it does not double the force.
171 people found this useful

The gravitational force between two objects?

The gravitational force is a force between any two masses (so,basically, any object). The force depends on the mass and on thedistance. More mass --> more force; greater distance --> lessforce.

What makes gravitational force noticeable between two objects?

Physically, gravitional force between objects is notices when the two objects are of different mass and are not separated by an "ideal" distance (the ideal distance being there the pulls of both are cancelled out). The gravitional force would cause a net movement of one object towards the other, the (MORE)

What would the force of gravitation be if the distance between these two objects increased by ten times?

Well, if you are increasing the distance between two objects, gravitational force will be less. The further you are away from the ground, the less gravitational force there is on you. To figure out gravitational force: it's the mass of object 1 multiplied by the mass of object 2 divided by the qu (MORE)

The strength of a gravitational force between two objects depends on what?

The strength of the gravitation force between two objects depends upon the distance between the two objects and their masses. F = (M 1 *M 2 *G)/R 2 (Newton's Law of Gravitation) Here M 1 and M 2 are the masses of the two objects, G is the universal gravitational constant, and R is the d (MORE)

Strength of the force of gravitation between two objects increases as the?

The Strength of the force of gravitation between two objects increases as the mass of the objects increase .. F g =Gm 1 m 2 -------- r 2 Where G is the gravitational constant of any mass, or 6.67259*10 -11 Nm 2 /kg 2 and r is the distance between the center of masses of the two objects (MORE)

The force of gravitation between two objects is 500 newtons suppose the distance stayed the same but the mass of one of the bodies doubled what would the new force of gravitational attraction be?

The force is proportional to the product of the two masses. Original product = (m 1 x m 2 ) New product = (2m 1 x m 2 ) = 2(m 1 x m 2 ) = double the original product. Since the product of the masses doubled while the distance remained unchanged, the force doubled. The new force attracting eac (MORE)

How does distance affect the gravitational pull between two objects?

The farther apart the objects are, the smaller the attractive force between them becomes. The force falls off as the square of the distance. That means that if you double the distance, the force becomes ( 1/2 2 ) = 1/4 as strong. If you triple the distance, the force becomes (1/3 2 ) = 1/9 as s (MORE)

Explain how the gravitational force between objects changes when the distance?

The gravitational force is inversely proportional to the square of the distance. For example, if you increase the distance by a factor of 10, the force will decrease by a factor of 100 (10 squared). The gravitational force is inversely proportional to the square of the distance. For example, if you (MORE)

By how many times would the gravitational force between two objects decrease if the distance between the two objects was tripled?

By a factor of 9. Gravitational force is inversely proportional to the square of the distance.\n By a factor of 9. Gravitational force is inversely proportional to the square of the distance.\n By a factor of 9. Gravitational force is inversely proportional to the square of the distance.\n By a f (MORE)

How does the force of gravitationbetween two objects change when the distance between them is reduced to half?

In that case, the force would increase by a factor of 4. Gravity obeys an inverse-square law.\n In that case, the force would increase by a factor of 4. Gravity obeys an inverse-square law.\n In that case, the force would increase by a factor of 4. Gravity obeys an inverse-square law.\n In that c (MORE)

Describe the gravitational force between two objects at a certain distance apart compared with objects of larger masses with the same distance between them?

With more mass, there will be more gravitational force. The force is proportional to the product of the masses. And (as we know from Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation) the force is also inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the centers of the two masses. So, if you have a (MORE)

How does distance between two objects affect the gravitational force?

The equation for gravitational force is F=(GM 1 M 2 )/R 2 Where R is the distance between the 2 objects, this is an inverse square law. So if you double the distance between the 2 objects the force gets 4 times smaller. Considering Einstein's theory of space-time, each object within space emits a (MORE)

What happens to the gravitational force of 2 objects if you double the mass of both objects and double the distance between them?

Nice question! Let's take those one step at a time: -- Start with a gravitational force of ' F ' between two masses. -- Double the mass of one object. The product of the masses doubles. The force changes from ' F ' to ' 2F '. -- Double the mass of the other object. The product of the m (MORE)